Users of latest Chrome browser on Windows, Mac OS, Linux and Android will have some of most intrusive types of ads blocked automatically


Google will start automatically blocking intrusive ads within its Chrome browser for desktop and Android from Thursday 15 February.

The change, announced in June, will see the dominant browser that is used by over 56% of internet users block some of the most intrusive ads including full-page prestitial ads, flashing animated ads and auto-playing video ads with sound.

“A big source of frustration is annoying ads: video ads that play at full blast or giant pop-ups where you can’t seem to find the exit icon,” said Rahul Roy-Chowdhury, vice president for Chrome. “These ads are designed to be disruptive and often stand in the way of people using their browsers for their intended purpose — connecting them to content and information. It’s clear that annoying ads degrade what we all love about the web.”

The built-in adblocker will stop showing all ads on any sites that repeatedly display any one of a list of the most disruptive ads, as decided by the Coalition for Better Ads (CBA) – a group of advertising and online media companies including Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Proctor & Gamble, Unilever and a collection of publishers including News Corp, Thomson Reuters and the Washington Post.

Among the list of banned ad types are anything that pops up, makes noise, blocks the screen or won’t go away. But it also includes sites with an advert density of over 30%.

Ads classified as intrusive by the Coalition for Better Ads Better and therefore blocked by Chrome. Photograph: Coalition for Better Ads Better

“Although a few of the ad experiences that violate the Better Ads Standards are problems in the advertisement itself, the majority of problematic ad experiences are controlled by the site owner — such as high ad density or prestitial ads with countdown,” said Chris Bentzel, engineering manager for Chromium.

Bentzel explained that Chrome’s approach to adblocking is therefore quite different to other adblocking tools. Instead of outright blocking all ads, Google will inform sites that contravene the CBA guidelines, give them 30 days to rectify the situation and only then block ads from sites that persist

The Guardian